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Self-Employed Van Driving Jobs

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Those looking to join the ranks of the self-employed have many options to earn a living using items they already own. Motorists with vans, a decent driving record, valid driver’s license and auto insurance can creatively earn some income just for driving. The key is knowing your area and its needs for drivers. For example, a touristy city may have a high need for tour guides, while a small industrial town may benefit from more rural mail delivery persons.

Driving People

Transporting people is one way to earn money with a van. The driver is essentially working as a private taxi or chauffeur. Popular car services such as Uber and Lyft partner with drivers to offer rides to locals needing a lift. Lyft vets ride-seekers to an extent, but it is ultimately up to the driver to determine if the potential reward is worth the risk of allowing strangers into his van.

Success Tip: Drum up business the old-fashioned way, starting with friends and family and word of mouth. Online postings on free websites can also be helpful, as well as posting fliers in local libraries, college campuses and coffee shops.

Transporting Furniture

People on the move need reliable furniture movers. Van owners with physical stamina can consider transporting furniture for a living. This option may require some reconfiguration of the van, like removing the seats.

Success Tip: Check with an insurance agent to make sure your policy will cover any damages to the cargo and the vehicle.

Rural Carrier Associates

While a van is not necessarily required for this position, the U.S. Postal Service expects rural carrier associates to use their own vehicle for this job. The associate works part-time on an as-needed basis delivering mail to rural areas when a regular carrier is not available. The vehicle must be insured and in good condition.

Success Tip: Working as a rural carrier associate can pave the way to full-time employment with the U.S. Postal Service. Excelling in this job could give aspiring postal workers a real advantage.

References

About the Author

Olivia Johnson covers issues relating to the U.S. workforce and human resources. A professional journalist since 2001, she has worked in print and broadcast media for news outlets including ABC affiliates in Tennessee and Alabama, CBS Radio News, Westwood One and public radio. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications and is currently based in Tennessee.

Photo Credits

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