x
franckreporter/E+/GettyImages

List of Jobs Working in an Office

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Working in an office is ideal for many of us. If you can type accurately and fast, answer phones, file papers, write press releases, speak professionally with customers, or handle office equipment you can work in an office. Office jobs often come with good hours and benefits. Find the office job that suits you.

Writer/Editor

Writers and editors, whether they on staff or work from home, work in an office. Writers create content for print publications, online websites and blogs. Editors correct content written by others.

Receptionist

A receptionist works in an office greeting customers, answering phones, writing emails, sending mail, filing, routing phone calls to specific employees, and taking messages.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by Sapling
Brought to you by Sapling

Customer Service Representative

As a customer service representative you would be knowledgeable about the business you work for, as well as the products and services, so you can help customers. You would be answering calls and emails, taking orders, and issuing refunds.

Accountant

Accountants work in an office environment. Duties include tax preparation, filing taxes, paying clients' bills, and receiving payments. Accountants are also called bookkeepers.

Office Manager

Office managers manage an office work environment. Job duties can range from hiring and firing, scheduling employees, delegating work, training new employees, creating and enforcing office policies, supervising staff, resolving issues, and maintaining computer systems.

Medical Office Jobs

Medical billing and medical transcription are both office jobs. Both take special skills and knowledge so you would need training in medical billing or medical transcription.

Call Center

Working in a call center office requires answering incoming phone calls from existing customers of the company you work for. You would need to answer questions, take complaints and process orders.

Medical Receptionist

Medical offices also need a receptionist to welcome patients, answer calls, take messages, and file papers. Unlike medical transcription and billing you don't need to train formally to become a medical receptionist.

About the Author

Nicole LaMarco is a copywriter and content marketing strategist with more than 15 years of experience. See her website at www.NickyLamarco.com

Cite this Article