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How to Email a Recruiter

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You have two choices when unemployment strikes: Fret when you don't find enough job postings in your field, or take matters into your own hands. It's time to become an effective closer and market the product you know best – yourself.

When to Email a Recruiter

Recruiters can get your resume in front of the right people faster than you can. They know which positions are available for you to fill now and which ones would be a good match in the future.

How to Email a Recruiter

Find out who does the hiring at your targeted employer. Comb through the company's "About Us" section and "Our Team" list on their website. Use your favorite search engine to find each team member's contact information if you do not see it on the company website. Recruiter Colleen Flynn at CDW wants job seekers to demonstrate their level of interest in the company. She takes a pass on candidates who do not know anything about the company's recent activities or who won't attempt to connect with any current or former employees.

Punch up your resume. Highlight your skills instead of listing blocks of time with a particular employer.

Comb through the job postings on websites such as LinkedIn, Indeed.com and Monster.com. Make a list of the skills in job postings that intrigue you. Use that list to create keywords to include in your cover letter.

Set email filters. You do not want to miss any replies.

Take advantage of networking sites. LinkedIn provides messaging and notifications buttons in the header on the homepage. Replies on LinkedIn tend to be fast during business hours, so click on those buttons throughout the workday.

Create a killer close. When you email a recruiter, you are the product, so be bold. Don't just ask for the interview. Tell the recruiter how and why hiring you will enhance the company's bottom line.

State what you bring to the table. Provide specific examples of what you have accomplished. "I sell a lot of widgets every year," tells the recruiter you might not have the relevant experience for the job, according to Amy Caston, a 16-year recruiter. Instead, tell the recruiter you earned $350,000 in sales last year. State that you plan to do the same or better this year, and your inbox will flood with job offers.

How to Follow Up With the Recruiter

  • Read the reply all the way through.
  • Whitelist the sender. 
  • Click on any links the recruiter provides.
  • Thank the recruiter for contacting you.
  • State whether or not the position interests you.
  • Provide your name, phone number and the best time to call you. 

Tip

Be on time for any scheduled phone calls, face-to-face interviews or pre-employment activities.

Sample Emails to Recruiters

First Contact Sample Email

Dear XXX:

I saw your job posting for the position of Director of Life Enrichment at Friendship Village Senior Living. I served as the Day Program Director for Options for Individuals for two years. During that time, I supervised eight employees and monitored 51 community sites. Our team held monthly in-house activity planning sessions, weekly community meals and biannual voter-rights training sessions using a people-first focus.

I would like to hear more about the position. I am available between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Eastern time. Please feel free to call me at (XXX-XXX-XXXX). I look forward to speaking with you at your convenience.

Sincerely,

John Smith

Phone Interview Follow-up Sample Email

Dear XXX:

Thank you for presenting the details of the position of Quality Assurance Specialist at Orange County Alzheimer Support Center. I have attached the references you requested.

Linda Miller says that she will be at the Fiesta Mall office all week between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. Arizona time. Her number is (XXX-XXX-XXXX). Bill Bowers says he will be in Beijing, China until May 7th. He says to email him at BBowers@SeelyCounty.gov or wait until the 8th to call him.

Sincerely,

Jane Jones

References

About the Author

Smith has been a student, independent contractor, entrepreneur, car salesperson, beauty consultant, and a water treatment salesperson. All of those career changes had their benefits and drawbacks. Smith believes in experiential learning as key to success in the work world, so don't be afraid to try something new that does not match your official qualifications. Smith urges business owners and job seekers alike to dig deep and discover what motivates you to give your best.