ElNariz/iStock/GettyImages

How to Become a Model for "Teen Vogue"

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Many young girls (and some boys) aspire to be models. The lifestyle seems glamorous and some of the top models are very well paid. It is always advisable to have a Plan B, as there are some drawbacks to this aspiration. It almost goes without saying that this is a very competitive field. "Teen Vogue," which is part of the Vogue family and published by Conde Nast is one of the top fashion magazines. A young girl with an interest in the magazine and the fashion world should also consider alternative careers such as writing about fashion -- internships are sometimes offered at "Teen Vogue." But there are some concrete steps you can take to make your modeling career a possibility.

Study this and other fashion magazines. Pick up tips on modeling, immersing yourself in the world of style and glamour. Do not copy any particular model, but maximize your own looks. Develop your own look. Be attentive of your health, making sure you have eight hours of sleep a night and eat a healthy balanced diet. Some professional models look impossibly thin, but there may be a trend away from this emaciated look, as it has been much criticized for contributing to eating disorder in young girls.

Sign up with a legitimate modeling agency. Beware of the many that are not reputable and are prepared to exploit the dreams of aspiring models. A legitimate agency should not ask you for money for joining. Agencies get their fees by taking a percentage of your earnings. The agency may advise you about the portfolio of photographs you need, or you may decide to get your own head shots done. Wear minimal or no make-up for these pictures.

Search for local teen modeling jobs, as this will get you noticed and will also improve your confidence and professionalism. It is best not to be so focused on one particular magazine, so you won't close your mind to other opportunities. Always turn up on time for any appointments and be pleasant and easy to work with.

Warning

Always take a parent or trusted adult along if you are under 18. Never do anything you do not feel comfortable with, and beware of being exploited.

References

About the Author

Noreen Wainwright has been writing since 1997. Her work has appeared in "The Daily Telegraph," "The Guardian," "The Countryman" and "The Lady." She has a Bachelor of Arts in social sciences from Liverpool Polytechnic and a postgraduate law degree from Staffordshire University.