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How to Prepare a Resume for a Job

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Creating a strong resume is important in any economic climate. Whether jobs are scarce or plentiful, a professional resume can get you the job if you prepare it well. Preparing a resume for an interview is a simple task that you can complete with any level of education. Although it is easy to do, it has critical elements that can make the difference between an employer hiring you and him tossing your resume.

Tailor the resume to the specific position that you want. Using your skills and experience to apply for a position as a writer, for instance, is different from applying for a job as an editor. Emphasizing features of your previous employment that relate specifically to the job you want can help you land the job.

Format the resume correctly on a 8 1/2-by-11-inch paper with a 1-inch border. The information you list should be consistent. For instance, list all of the dates of the jobs with the name of the month and the year as a number.

List a couple of key points at the top of the resume to help employers quickly gauge if you are right for the job. For instance, discuss major accomplishments and the direction you want your career to take in your objective.

Emphasize what you have accomplished rather than the duties of your previous positions, recommends JobStar Central. Indicate awards won and specific tasks that you excelled at. Employers typically know what a position entails, but they are not aware of what made you excellent at your job.

Double-check your resume for spelling errors and poor grammar. Your resume may be immediately discarded if it has these types of errors. They look unprofessional and make you look uneducated.

Tip

Eliminate your objective if it is too broad. Employers would rather see no objective than see one that doesn&#039;t say much.

Warning

Don&#039;t include positions that may provide you with poor references. If you left a job with no notice, for instance, you may not want to list it.

About the Author

Theresa Pickett has written since 2007. She graduated from Flagler College with a Bachelor of Arts in history and Vanderbilt University with a Master of Education in elementary education. As a certified teacher who earned the ETS Recognition of Excellence for Praxis II Elementary Education, she has been published in "Student Filmmakers Magazine" and "Model Life Magazine."

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