motorcycle lines image by BorisNoWorries from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

How to Become a Kawasaki Dealer

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Kawasaki Motorcycle Corp., accrues more than $1.6 billion annually in revenue with over 400 employees and 1,500 dealerships around the world. Kawasaki specializes in designing, engineering, and manufacturing some of the most sought after motorcycles, watercrafts, ATVs and utility vehicles. A business looking to add Kawasaki products to its customer offerings has the opportunity to tap into an exploding market with customer base demonstrating loyalty to the Kawasaki brand. Becoming a dealer with Kawasaki involves a simple process of contacting a regional sales office to discuss opportunities to represent the product lines.

Visit the Kawasaki corporate website and review all Kawasaki products to gain a firm understanding if Kawasaki products make sense for your end customer. Kawasaki manufactures sports bikes, ATVs, watercrafts and water skis, along with utility vehicles and RUVs. End customers typically consist of those individuals seeking power in performance coupled with an enthusiasm for style.

Click on the “Help” link located in the foot of the webpage. When the help page loads, use the drop down menu to select “Become a Dealer.”

Contact the regional sales office closest to you. All dealer inquiries go through one of the four regional sales offices: Texas, New Jersey, Georgia and California. The regional sales office will discuss requirements and options and provide information regarding the application process.

Tip

Kawasaki does not list any information regarding requirements to become a dealer, neither does the company provide information relating to the application process to the public; however, potential customers should expect to demonstrate the ability to make a substantial financial investment, have good credit and put together a sound business plan, as well as a sales and marketing plan.

Warning

Candidates seeking a dealership opportunity likely will have to submit to credit checks conducted by Kawasaki. Those with credit problems may want to postpone exploring dealership opportunities until fixing such issues.

About the Author

Kenneth W. Michael Wills is a writer on culture, society and business. With more than 15 years of experience in sales, public relations and written communications, Wills' passion is delighting audiences with invigorating perspectives and refreshing ideas. He has ghostwritten articles on a diverse range of topics for corporate websites and composed proposals for organizations seeking growth opportunities.

Cite this Article