What to Put on a Personal Profile on a Job Application

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In a tight job market, with fewer individuals actually getting the chance to interview for positions they seek, the personal profile section of a job application may be the only opportunity you have to show your potential employer who you are. While this application section shouldn’t be lengthy, you should dedicate time and care to composing it, as any misstep could make you seem less professional and show your potential employer that you are not, in fact, the quality candidate they are looking for.

Description of You

In the first section of your personal profile, you should introduce yourself. In ideally a sentence, but absolutely no more than two, explain who you are. In this section, try to include as much information about what makes you distinctive as possible. For example, if writing a personal profile for a job as an account clerk, focus less on your love of numbers and more on your exemplary performance in college, as the later is what will separate you from the herd.

Summary of Skills

Compose a sentence or two outlining the skills you possess. For optimum success, tailor these skills to the job description. For example, if the job description says that they are seeking someone with exemplary organization and interpersonal communication skills, take care to include these desired skills in your summary of skills, as long as you can do so without lying. Avoid overly flowery explanations or verbose composition in this section, sticking instead to the key points that will make you appropriate for the position.

Goal Description

Conclude your personal profile with a sentence explaining your goals. In this sentence, include not just your immediate career goal -- obtaining a job with the company with which you are applying -- but also your ultimate career goal. By doing so, you can show application reviewers that you are motivated and will continue to strive for advancement.

Keep it Concise

When it comes to a personal statement, the old adage "less is more" definitely applies. Hiring committees have a finite amount of time to dedicate to the reviewing of applications. If your personal profile is overly lengthy, they may skip over it entirely. Keep this section between three and five sentences, saying exactly what you mean in each instead of dancing around the issues and using filler language.

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About the Author

Erin Schreiner is a freelance writer and teacher who holds a bachelor's degree from Bowling Green State University. She has been actively freelancing since 2008. Schreiner previously worked for a London-based freelance firm. Her work appears on eHow, Trails.com and RedEnvelope. She currently teaches writing to middle school students in Ohio and works on her writing craft regularly.