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Jobs for the Unemployable

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Public, private and non-profit job placement companies can assist those workers considered unemployable to find positions in a variety of fields. Many placement services are free to individuals with little to no income and can be obtained by requesting an interview or completing an application. Other resources for finding employment are local job boards, city and county newspapers, and online job search sites.

Survey Taker

Online, home and business survey opportunities are available to part-time and full-time students, professionals and unemployable workers. Sign up to work as a survey taker and provide an overview of your interests, qualifications and spending habits. The information provided in a survey is confidential and provides companies with vital statistics about products and services. Surveys are conducted at specified times and on specific days, so you must be available to travel to a specific location or have access to the Internet, a telephone and/or fax machine in order to complete many of these surveys.

Product Tester

The gaming and retail industries employ product testers to help developers learn what works and what does not work about a product or service. Little to no experience is required, and most product testers are paid on a per project basis. Product testers may be asked to test a product throughout the different stages of development or evaluate product packaging and rate the product before it enters the market. Product testers are typically required to travel to a testing center and must use the product in view of a panel or testing team. Testers should expect to answer questions before and/or after each use.

Personal Assistant

Businesspersons, professionals, entrepreneurs as well as busy moms and dads have hectic schedules that can leave little time to run errands at the start or end of a day. Workers who are unemployable can obtain part-time and full-time employment as a personal assistant. If you do not have a skill set, many employers will hire you to perform task-oriented services, such as picking up lunch, dry cleaning, picking up children, grocery shopping and delivering mail, for example. Those with transferable skills, such as basic typing and time management, may be asked to perform more challenging tasks.

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About the Author

Charlie Gaston has written numerous instructional articles on topics ranging from business to communications and estate planning. Gaston holds a bachelor's degree in international business and a master's degree in communications. She is fluent in Spanish and has extensive travel experience.

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