x
Deklofenak/iStock/Getty Images

Becoming a Notary Public in Alabama

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Becoming an Alabama notary public costs less than $100, and Alabama notaries are allowed to earn money for performing their notarial duties. Once appointed, you may charge $5 for all notarial acts performed during your four-year term. If you are an Alabama resident, at least 18 years old and can read and write English, you are eligible to apply for an Alabama notary commission.

Application Process and Bond Requirements

To begin the application process, contact your county's probate judge, the Alabama official empowered to appoint notaries public. Request an Alabama notary public application and ask if the probate judge allows applicants to submit applications by mail, or if they must apply in person. The next step is to purchase a $25,000 notary bond, which typically costs about $50. Mail or deliver to the probate judge the completed Alabama notary application, proof that you have purchased the requisite notary bond, proof of residence in your county and the judge’s application fee. Application fees vary by county, but they range from $11 to $25.

Approval and Issuance of Commission

The probate judge will review your application for completeness, proof of your $25,000 notary bond purchase and correct fee payment. If those items have been fulfilled, the judge will issue your notary commission and notify you and the Alabama secretary of state of your appointment to the office of notary public.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by Sapling
Brought to you by Sapling

Critical Final Step

Alabama notary public laws require that a newly commissioned notary must purchase an Alabama seal of office, which as of the date of publication is obtainable for as little as $12.

About the Author

Central Texas writer Brenda Stone has been writing how-to articles about self-employment and topics of interest to America's notaries public for nearly a decade. In 2006, she self-published two niche market e-books about self-employment and running a mobile notary and notary signing agent business. Since that time, Stone's articles about self-employment as a mobile notary, current events, and modern notary issues have appeared monthly in e-newsletters and The Notary Digest, a popular e-zine published by the American Association of Notaries.

Cite this Article