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How to Write a Business Thank You Letter for a Business Opportunity

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A "thank you" letter for a business opportunity should clearly convey excitement about a new venture. Formal letters are typed and sent by postal mail. Avoid handwritten letters, which are sometimes misunderstood unless the penmanship is flawless, and emails, which are sometimes overlooked or read hurriedly. Take your time with the letter even though it is brief. The quality of the letter reflects on your professionalism.

Write the letter within 24 hours of receiving confirmation of the business opportunity. Responding in a timely manner shows enthusiasm and excitement.

Address the letter to just one person, even if other staff members participated in the decision. Exceptions could include an opportunity granted by two equal owners of a company. In that situation, send a separate letter to each. Otherwise, address the letter to the person authorizing the opportunity, such as the primary owner or department manager.

Write just a few paragraphs. Offer thanks for being selected for the business opportunity and indicate enthusiasm for getting started. Close the letter by promising your best effort and that this is the start of a long and mutually beneficial relationship. If the business relationship is not new, indicate excitement for new business from a valued company.

Proofread the letter for mistakes. Especially avoid misspelling the recipient's name or misstating her title, but check the entire letter for grammar and spelling mistakes.

End the letter with an appropriate valediction, also known as a complimentary closing. Examples include "Yours truly," "Best regards," and "Sincerely." Sign the letter below the valediction and above your printed name.

Mail the letter in an envelope with the address and your return address typed, unless the letter is handwritten. In that case, hand write the mailing address and return address.

About the Author

Robert Lee has been an entrepreneur and writer with a background in starting small businesses since 1974. He has written for various websites and for several daily and community newspapers on a wide variety of topics, including business, the Internet economy and more. He studied English in college and earned a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Governor's State University.

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