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How to Create a Work Order for Manufacturing

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Most manufacturing businesses require the help of service professionals on a daily basis.Manufacturers create products and use many machines to do the job. Often times, machines break down and require a work order form for them to be fixed. To provide instructions about the task you need completed, a work order needs to be filled out. A work order is a written document that gives instructions to the service professional regarding the project to be accomplished. For example, a building superintendent needs to create work orders for a maintenance crew to repair and examine renter concerns.

Divide the work order into parts. This can include contact information, problem and work assignment.

Enter important information at the top of the work order such as company name, date, address and phone numbers.

Type a work order number and job number to the right of the contact information. To keep the work orders organized, the job number serves as a separate identification number used to put smaller jobs under one work order form.

Record the full name and address of the service worker in the assignment section. Be sure to put the full address of the spot you want the work performed.

Explain in full detail the problem that needs to be fixed in the problem area on the work order. Add specific information that will assist the service professional in finishing the task competently.

Create a list of the tools and necessities needed to complete the job. This list should be written in the work description part. Be clear about who is to provide the tools to do the job—you or the worker.

Include a portion at the bottom of the work order containing disclaimers, terms or additional rules concerning the job. This can include such things as an after-hours phone number in case of any problems that should arise or confidentiality issues.

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About the Author

From Toronto, Elyse Twist began her writing career in 2003. Eager to write about most topics, her main focus is women's issues. She recently had her article about beauty pageant stigmas published in "Post City Magazines." Her articles has also appeared in "Eye Weekly" and "Glow." Twist obtained a Bachelor of Arts, Honors, in professional writing from York University.

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