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How to Make a Real Estate License Inactive

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In all lines of work, people may decide to leave a job that no longer interests them or simply have the desire to try something new. Real estate professionals are hard-working people who are not immune to the occasional itch to change careers. In most states, those who hold real estate licenses are required to take continuing education courses and pay yearly license renewal fees. If you are considering leaving real estate and not returning, it may benefit you to place your license into an inactive status.

Fill-out the necessary forms provided by the real estate licensing agency in your state in order to deactivate your real estate license. The form names and procedures for making your license inactive will vary in each state. Some states may require you to submit online forms, while others may only allow paper forms to be turned in by mail or in person.

Stop reporting continuing education hours for your real estate license. In most states, if course hours are not reported at their scheduled time, a real estate license will be placed into an inactive status.

Refuse to pay your renewal fee on your real estate license by its due date. In most states, failure to pay your license renewal fee will cause your license to go into an inactive status.

Tip

Going through the state real estate licensing agency to make your real estate license inactive is the best solution. Deactivating your license through the proper channels will reduce future penalties should you decide to re-activate the license. Visit the state real estate licensing agency's website or give them a call to ask for details on what forms need to be completed in order to deactivate your real estate license.

Warning

If your license goes inactive by any of the means listed above, you will have to complete the the hours of class time you missed, pay any late renewal fees, as well as pay any penalty fees assessed by your state agency before the license can be reinstated.

About the Author

Marcelle Greene Edins began writing in 1999 and has written for "Today's Builder" magazine and online for various websites. She is presently writing her first novel. She holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Texas at San Antonio and a J.D. from St. Mary's University School of Law.

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