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How to Become an At-Home Job Recruiter

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

At-home job recruiters enjoy the flexibility to perform their work at home. Home-based recruiters work for corporations, recruiting new employees, and for staffing agencies or search firms, whose clients pay for recruiting services. Employers pay at-home recruiters commissions, draws against commissions or salaries. Some employers pay for home office necessities, while others expect home-based recruiters to provide their own equipment, such as computer and high-speed Internet services.

Home-Based Recruiting

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Decide whether you want to work for a corporation or recruiting firm. Many corporations advertise for contract recruiters on Internet job sites. These kinds of jobs may offer recruiters the chance to work at home. Identify long-term growth industries with present and projected hiring needs.

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Approach corporations you already work with and inquire about at-home recruiting jobs. If you already work for corporate clients as a staffing agency or executive search firm recruiter, you know many companies and their internal search teams. Your best client, however, may be prohibited from offering you a job, depending on the contract that was signed with your current firm. Your present employer may decide to charge the client a fee to hire you, thereby enabling you to obtain the at-home recruiting job you want.

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Apply directly to job postings for at-home recruiters. Some corporations advertise for virtual or telecommute positions because they need specialized help in a certain region or need to add staff in a certain market. Search CareerBuilder.com, Monster.com, SimplyHired.com or ERE.net, a recruiting industry blog.Some companies advertise directly on networking sites, such as LinkedIn.com. Contacts in your network can deliver your resume to companies looking for at-home recruiters, or you may apply according to instructions in the company's job post.

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Apply to executive search firms and staffing agencies that advertise for at-home, virtual and telecommuting recruiters. Search firms and staffing agencies have different roles for recruiters. Some firms have "full desk" roles, in which recruiters sell and close client business and then find finalist candidates for clients' jobs. Other firms hire home-based business developers, researchers, project managers, administrative and operations staff. These virtual teams collaborate to fill client jobs.

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Create a resume tailored to each job post you answer. Mention at-home recruiting experience and prior recruiting or industry roles. Recap performance versus recruiting targets or quotas. Note familiarity with widely used applicant-tracking systems. Provide work examples as long as confidential or client information is not divulged. Prepare a list of jobs you filled in the last year. Line up references who can attest to your work ethic and responsible character.

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Interview for at-home recruiter positions. These may be phone or in-person interviews. Always ask the hiring manager for a personal meeting before discussing compensation or accepting a position.

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Always ask questions about how the company compensates at-home recruiters before accepting a position. Compensation will depend on the hiring manager's preferences and your experience. Hourly rate, draw against commissions, salary or straight commission plans exist.

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Tip

Approach corporations and recruiting firms without job postings if your experience fits their recruiting approach.

Negotiate necessary equipment for your at-home recruiting job before accepting the position.

Warning

Research any at-home recruiting opportunity. Avoid firms that request payment for support services or recruiter training.

About the Author

Laura Lemay started writing in 1996. She has published articles on Luxist, Paw Nation, StyleList, Gadling, Urlesque, Asylum, BloggingStocks and other websites. Lemay also worked at "Ladies Home Journal" and "Institutional Investor." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Smith College and a Master of Arts in education from Virginia Tech.

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