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How to Become a Probation Officer in Michigan

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Probation officers work with individuals who have broken the law and been reprimanded by Michigan courts. The probation officer's responsibility is to ensure that the violators obey the stipulations put in place by the courts. Some of the primary duties of probation officers in Michigan include meeting with probationers, providing relative information for helpful resources and monitoring the behavior of the probationers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the outlook for probation officers is excellent.

Obtain a bachelor's degree in criminal justice, social work or another related field from a Michigan college or university. For supervisory positions, most require a master's degree in one of these fields. You cannot become a probation officer in Michigan without first earning at least a bachelor's degree. While taking classes, explore opportunities for internships with Michigan courts to add to your work experience in the judicial system.

Fulfill the pre-requisites. To work as a probation officer in the state of Michigan, you must be at least 21 years old, not have any felony convictions and pass physical and mental health examinations. You must also pass a drug screening.

Register for and take the Corrections Commission of the Michigan Department of Corrections exam. All probation officers in the state of Michigan must pass this exam in order to obtain certification to work as a probation officer. This test consists of a writing portion, a reading portion and a multiple choice portion which will test your knowledge of probationary concepts and information.

Pass the Michigan Civil Service Exam. This is required to apply for probation officer positions in Michigan.

Apply for probation officer positions in Michigan. Once you are hired, your place of employment will require you to participate in a probation officer training program.

2016 Salary Information for Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists

Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists earned a median annual salary of $50,160 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, probation officers and correctional treatment specialists earned a 25th percentile salary of $39,530, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $67,420, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 91,300 people were employed in the U.S. as probation officers and correctional treatment specialists.

About the Author

Jess Jones has been a freelance writer since 2005. She has been a featured contributing writer for "Curve Magazine" and she teaches English composition at a small college in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She received her Master of Arts in English language and literature in 2002.

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