Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists

Annual Earnings Percentiles

Skill Scores

  • social icon 88

    Social

  • supported icon 67

    Supported

  • purpose icon 62

    Purpose

  • creative icon 59

    Creative

  • analytical icon 20

    Analytical

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College Majors

Showing data from the American Community Survey for the following US Census occupation categories:

Bachelor's degree majors are shown.

  • Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

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    What Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists Do

    Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists monitor and work with probationers to prevent them from committing new crimes.

    Work Environment

    Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists work with probationers and parolees, some of whom may be dangerous. Workers may be assigned to fieldwork in high-crime areas or in institutions where there is a risk of violence or communicable disease. As a result, the work can be stressful and dangerous.

    How to Become a Probation Officer or Correctional Treatment Specialist

    Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists usually need a bachelor’s degree. In addition, most employers require candidates to pass oral, written, and psychological exams.

    Job Outlook

    Employment of probation officers and correctional treatment specialists is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Limited state and local government funding for corrections will temper employment growth. However, job openings should be plentiful because many people leave the occupation each year.

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    Job Trends for Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists

    Curious about our data? Learn more about our methodology .

    This occupation supported 90,300 jobs in 2012 and 91,700 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 1.6%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to decrease by 1.1% in 2022 to 89,300 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 90,100, compared with an observed value of 91,700, 1.8% higher than expected. This indicates current employment trends are about on track with the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 3.7% in 2024 to 95,000 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 89,100 jobs for 2024, 6.2% lower than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are much better than the 2012 trend within this occupation.

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