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How to Make Money Writing Resumes

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

It can be difficult to objectively describe what we do at a job, much less describe it succinctly. When writing resumes, we sometimes forget to quantify our descriptions, state our achievements and start each descriptive line with a verb like "produced" or "met." Because career futures depend so heavily on this document, some of us will gladly pay another person to write our resume. Take advantage of this opportunity---make money writing resumes by following the suggestions below.

Prepare a variety of resume templates to pull from. Types of resumes include chronological (organized historically, starting with the most recent job), functional (organized by skills and accomplishments) and combination (organized using a combination of the person's capabilities and a complete job history). Learn what qualities and features make resumes stand out from the rest and collect examples of stellar resumes to refer to. Then practice your trade---volunteer to write resumes for your friends or neighbors.

Become a Certified Professional Resume Writer and a member of the Professional Association of Resume Writers & Career Coaches (See Resources 4) to gain credibility.

Submit applications to online resume writing services like ResumeEdge.com and ResumeWriters.com (See Resources 2 & 3).

Find clients. Advertise your resume writing services on Craigslist; start a blog with information about resume writing, career advice, interview strategies and other job search related topics; give your contact information to career services offices at local colleges and universities.

Compare resume writing fees at ResumeLines.com to help you determine what to charge your clients (See Resources 5).

Follow up with all clients and track who got jobs using the resumes you wrote; this will help you determine your success rate.

Tip

Write a list of resume related interview questions, then tweak it and add to it as you develop your interviewing skills.

About the Author

Gail began writing professionally in 2004. Now a full-time proofreader, she has written marketing material for an IT consulting company, edited auditing standards for CPAs and ghostwritten the first draft of a nonfiction Amazon bestseller. Gail holds a Master of Arts in English literature and has taught college-level business communication, composition and American literature.

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