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What Is a Maintenance Technician?

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

When the air conditioning and heating systems keep your office or apartment building cool in the summer and warm in the winter, all is right with the world. But when the heater breaks in the middle of an arctic blast in your area, you need some help. That means it is time to call the building's maintenance technician -- the go-to person when everything from the plumbing to the locks to the electricity malfunction -- to troubleshoot the problem.

Responsibilities

A maintenance technician is responsible for cleaning and basic repairs of buildings, equipment or tools. In a manufacturing facility, for instance, the technician monitors equipment daily, performs basic cleaning, resets equipment for the next day and complete repairs for continued production. When the tech can't repair facilities or equipment on his own, he communicates the need for outside repair to an operations director.

Maintenance Tech Requirements

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics includes technicians in its overview of "General Maintenance and Repair Workers." You don't normally need a formal education for a technician's job, though mechanical certifications help in jobs working with particular types of equipment. Pay varies by the scope of work, but the BLS indicated median annual pay was $35,210 as of 2012.

2016 Salary Information for General Maintenance and Repair Workers

General maintenance and repair workers earned a median annual salary of $36,940 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, general maintenance and repair workers earned a 25th percentile salary of $28,180, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $48,520, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 1,432,600 people were employed in the U.S. as general maintenance and repair workers.

References

About the Author

Neil Kokemuller has been an active business, finance and education writer and content media website developer since 2007. He has been a college marketing professor since 2004. Kokemuller has additional professional experience in marketing, retail and small business. He holds a Master of Business Administration from Iowa State University.

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