cut fall protection image by Christopher Niemann from Fotolia.com

Aerial Lift Rescue Instructions

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Rescuing a worker from an aerial lift can test the competency of any company whose employees need to work aloft. If the lift equipment fails, a manager or supervisor must behave quickly to get the worker safely back to the ground. The time to prepare for such incidents is not when they happen. Training for these events must be ongoing so that everyone involved with the process is familiar with how an aerial lift works and how to perform physical rescues.

Get into another aerial lift. Make sure two lanyards are present--one for you and the other for the worker you wish to rescue.

Raise the aerial lift under the fallen party or the worker who might be suspended in space. This gives the worker a safe landing spot after you rescue him from the compromised equipment.

Attach the second lanyard in the lift to your fellow employee. Make sure he is secure in the lanyard before proceeding.

Extract the worker from the failed equipment. Carefully lower him back to the ground. According to the Capital Safety website, you should get speedy medical attention for the worker if there is any evidence of injury.

Tip

The Capital Safety website suggests that self-rescue is the ideal scenario if the injured party is able to carry this out. You might not have a long time to figure out whether he can rescue himself or not.

Warning

A fallen worker may experience suspension trauma. According to the Rescue Training website, the condition can arise when the leg straps of a harness constrict the blood so that it does not reach the brain. Although this can lead to fainting, the website also says that many who suffer suspension trauma return to full health. Quick medical attention is the key.

Familiarize yourself with Occupational Safety and Health Administration rules. According to the Rescue Training website, the employer is responsible for rescuing an employee from an aerial lift. The employer should train all workers how to work safely at heights and how to rescue a co-worker if necessary.

References

About the Author

Angus Koolbreeze has been a freelance writer since 2007. He has been published in a variety of venues, including "He Reigns Magazine" and online publications. Koolbreeze has a Master of Arts in English from Western Michigan University.

Photo Credits

  • cut fall protection image by Christopher Niemann from Fotolia.com