Adult Literacy and High School Equivalency Diploma Teachers

Annual Earnings Percentiles

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  • Social: 89
  • Creative: 86
  • Purpose: 76
  • Analytical: 52
  • Supported: 49

What Adult Literacy and High School Equivalency Diploma Teachers Do

Adult literacy and high school equivalency diploma teachers instruct adults in basic skills, such as reading, writing, and speaking English. They also help students earn their high school equivalent diploma.

Work Environment

Adult literacy and high school equivalency diploma teachers are often employed by community colleges, community-based organizations, and public schools. Many adult education teachers work part time.

How to Become an Adult Literacy or High School Equivalency Diploma Teacher

Most adult literacy and high school equivalency diploma teachers must have at least a bachelor’s degree. Employers typically prefer workers who have some teaching experience.

Job Outlook

Employment of adult literacy and high school equivalency diploma teachers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth is expected as continued immigration to the United States will create demand for adult literacy and high school equivalency diploma programs.

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Growth & Trends

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This occupation supported 77,400 jobs in 2012 and 77,500 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 0.1%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to increase by 8.8% in 2022 to 84,200 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 78,700, compared with an observed value of 77,500, 1.5% lower than expected. This indicates current employment trends are about on track with the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 7.1% in 2024 to 83,000 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 85,500 jobs for 2024, 3.0% higher than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are worse than the 2012 trend within this occupation.