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Duties & Responsibilities of a Storekeeper

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The job title "storekeeper" was much more common in earlier times, when most stores were small and operated by the owner and a couple of trusted employees. The equivalent of a storekeeper today is a store manager, although you might find some businesses that refer to the manager as the storekeeper. Either way, the storekeeper is the person who oversees all operations and is there at opening and closing time.

Shipping and Receiving

The storekeeper is responsible for receiving all shipments of products and storing them in an organized manner so they are easy to locate later on. He might also be responsible for returning damaged goods to vendors. It helps if you have a warehousing background, or one that includes handling and tracking inventory.

Recordkeeping

As storekeeper, you'll track the inventory of products on the shelves as well as in storage areas elsewhere in the store. This lets you know when items need to be restocked. You will also maintain records of everything that is shipped and received. These records help determine when it’s time to make new orders to ensure products in are always in stock.

Another responsibility is keeping count of all items sold to assess which products are strong sellers and which ones languish on the store shelves. This means you'll likely keep track of sales and profits. An eye for detail and a head for numbers will be a big help.

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Managing

A storekeeper today will most likely be in charge of a store’s warehousing operations. This means you will oversee other warehouse workers. In some cases, you might also be tasked with overseeing employees in the front of the store, where the customers are.

Management duties might also include providing employee training and feedback, making schedules, overseeing maintenance and upkeep of the store, paying bills, and opening and closing the store at the beginning and end of each day.

About the Author

Cynthia Gomez has been writing and editing professionally for more than a decade. She is currently an editor at a major publishing company, where she works on various trade journals. Gomez also spent many years working as a newspaper reporter. She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Northeastern University.

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