boonchai wedmakawand/Moment/GettyImages

The Duties of a Contracting Officer

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Contracting officers work for federal government agencies where they bind the government to contracts that surpass the micro-purchase threshold, which is usually $3,000 as of 2014. They also handle a wide variety of contracting duties, from acquisition planning to contractor performance evaluations. To become a contracting officer, you need to have at least a bachelor’s degree, preferably in business, public administration or finance, and possess strong analytical and communication skills.

Administering Contracts

The main responsibility of contracting officers is to oversee the contracting process. They help develop acquisition policies, procedures and strategies; evaluate purchase requests to ensure they're consistent with the agency's needs; publicize forthcoming acquisitions to inform the public and invite bidders; and evaluate bid proposals to assess prices and contractor reliability. They also conduct market research, negotiate contract terms and conditions with interested suppliers, and award contracts to successful bidders. In addition, contracting officers ensure contractors adhere to regulations by periodically evaluating their performances and taking appropriate actions, such as terminating contracts when contractors repeatedly violate terms and conditions.

Representing the Government

When there is a dispute between an agency and a contractor, the contracting officer represents the government in the resolution meetings and upholds its position. Contracting officers also have a duty to recruit and supervise staff, such as contracting officer technical representatives, and consult with contracting officers in other government agencies to share market information.

About the Author

Based in New York City, Alison Green has been writing professionally on career topics for more than a decade. Her work has appeared in “U.S. News Weekly” magazine, “The Career” magazine and “Human Resources Journal.” Green holds a master's degree in finance from New York University.

Cite this Article