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Room Attendant Interview Questions

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A room attendant, also known as a maid, cleans guest rooms in hotels and motels. These jobs vary in pay and duties required from room to room, and require a set of skills and knowledge in order to do the job properly. There are specific questions that should be asked of a potential room attendant in a job interview.

What Type of Experience Do You Have?

This is a common question that is asked in most job interviews, so it might not seem specific to room attendants. That said, this may be the most important question for a room attendant, as it will let you know how many other specific questions you will need to ask him. If he has no experience, then you might not need to ask him any more questions and instead decide if you want to take the time and energy to teach the job. If he has experience, then ask where and what the job requirements were, along with how long it would usually take to clean each room.

Do You Have a Criminal Record?

This question must be asked, as the room attendant will be in people's rooms with their valuables. This could become a liability for the hotel or motel, especially if the attendant has a history of theft or burglary. While it is usually a good idea to do background checks on prospective employees, especially those who are going to be around guests' personal effects, this is also a test of the prospective room attendant's honesty. See how she responds to the question. If she does have a criminal record, ask if she has learned from her mistake and changed her ways.

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Do You Know About Room Hazards?

Regardless of experience, it is of the utmost importance that room attendants know about basic hazards that can occur in a room and how to deal with them. If there is broken glass on the floor or in the carpet, the room attendant must know that he must vacuum thoroughly to ensure that all of the glass is picked up so a guest won't step on it. Beds must be changed daily, and bathrooms should be sterilized as well. Attendants must also note and notify the hotel manager of frayed electrical cords and broken door or closet locks, so the problem can be fixed for the guests and the liability of the hotel.

About the Author

Hailing from Austin, Texas, Daniel Westlake has written under pen names for a myriad of publications all over the nation, ranging from national magazines to local papers. He now lives in Los Angeles, Calif. but regularly travels around the country and abroad, exploring and experiencing everything he can.

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