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Driving Jobs that Don't Require a CDL License

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

If you love being behind the wheel of a vehicle, you may be interested in a driving job. Not all driving jobs require a commercial driver's license (CDL), which requires highly specialized training. Indeed, you may be far more interested in jobs that do not require a CDL than jobs that do.

Driveaway Driver

You don't need a CDL to have a job where you drive long distances with other people's cars. Rather than load their cars onto large trailers filled with other cars, some people prefer to hire someone to drive it across the country for them. No special training or insurance is required, just a good driving record and the ability to safely move cars across the country quickly. Wages vary greatly depending on how many jobs you take and how far you drive cars, but payment is calculated on a per-mile basis. Rates for the same job are the same for anyone driving the vehicle.

Taxi Driver and Chauffeur

Taxi drivers and chauffeurs help get people where they need to be in a timely manner. Schedules vary widely between full-time, part-time, days, nights, weekends and casual schedules. Taxi drivers and chauffeurs must have a chauffeur's license to perform their duties in most states, and anyone who transports more than 16 passengers is required by federal law to have a commercial driver's license. Most larger cities have commissions that supervise taxis in the area and may impose additional regulations and restrictions. Patience and a high commitment to customer service are necessary to do this job properly, as is a working knowledge of the area you will be driving in. The job outlook for taxi drivers and chauffeurs is expected to be better than average through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Couriers

Couriers deliver packages and information using a car, van or truck. Most couriers work within a specified local area as opposed to delivering things over long distances. Some degree of physical fitness may be required, as couriers often have to move large, bulky packages from their vehicles directly to the person the package is addressed to. Having your high school diploma can help to land a courier position, but no formal professional training is necessary. A clean driving record is the main qualification for being able to work for a courier service. Knowing your way around the area you wish to drive in is essential for timely delivery of sensitive materials.

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About the Author

Nicholas Pell began writing professionally in 1995. His features on arts, culture, personal finance and technology have appeared in publications such as "LA Weekly," Salon and Business Insider. Pell holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.