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Color Consultant Job Responsibilities

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If you enjoy helping others look their best and have a flair for decorating, the job of a color consultant could be a possible career path. These professionals can brighten a personal appearance or a single room—all by just choosing the right colors for their clients.

What They Do

Most people may not notice color in their day-to-day lives, but professional color consultants know that color can literally change the way you feel. As a color consultant, your primary objective will be to use colors that affect moods and tones. Color consultants may work with women in assisting with wardrobe or cosmetic choices. You may also work with homeowners in choosing paint colors as well as furniture and other furnishings, such as draperies. Some color consultants also work with retail businesses.

Personal Color

When working with clients on color choices for clothing or makeup, color consultants must take into consideration the client's skin, facial features and hair and eye color. The right colors can highlight the eyes and brighten the complexion. When choosing makeup for a client, color consultants generally recommend either warm shades, such as reds, browns and peaches or cool colors like pinks and blues, all depending on the client's skin tone.

Helping With Homes

Color consultants are often asked to help choose colors for rooms where families spend the most time together. For family rooms, these workers know the best color is something in the warm color family such as reds, browns, rusts and oranges. Color consultants are trained to know these shades exude a feeling of warmth and work best when there is adequate natural lighting in the room. Color consultants also know that bright, cheery colors are good for kitchen and dining room where the family gathers for meals.

Requirements

Your job as a color consultant will require travel to a client's homes or place of business. Color consultants must have an eye for detail, as well as the knowledge of how different colors effect various properties, such as moods. While some colors may give client's the look they are seeking, it may not always fit the homeowner's taste and color consultants must be flexible with several options in mind. Many of these professionals hold degrees in the area of fashion merchandising or industrial design.

References

About the Author

Sherry Mitchell holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Middle Tennessee State University and has been writing for more than a decade. She is a full-time government reporter in Sumner County, Tenn.

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