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How Do I Get Paid to Be a Caretaker?

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Individuals interested in putting their landscaping and maintenance skills to use can seek employment as a caretaker. Caretakers help individuals, corporations and resorts take care of all aspects of property maintenance. Common tasks include those related to taking care of the lawn, such as mowing the lawn and trimming landscaped areas, and general home maintenance. Securing a paying job as a caretaker can provide other benefits, such as free or reduced rent.

Brush up on your skills. Keep in mind that taking care of an individual property or larger property, such as a park or resort, requires skills beyond basic landscaping skills, such as mowing and trimming. Other tasks that caretakers often complete include painting, general cleaning of common areas and maintenance of landscaping equipment, such as lawn mowers.

Tailor your resume to the job. Highlight positions or experience that relate to the job duties and responsibilities of a caretaker. Make note of any managerial or supervisory experience that helps demonstrate character traits often desired of caretakers, such as honesty and dependability.

Search for paying caretaker jobs. Look in local newspapers and online for caretaker positions in your area. Check with local parks, resorts and gated communities for leads on possible openings. Visit or call seasonal areas that may employ a full-time caretaker to keep property secure and keep up general maintenance during the off-season, such as summer cottage communities or communities located in winter getaways, and inquire about possible caretaker openings.

Complete an application and go through the interview process. Provide references if requested and fulfill other requirements for the position. Stress your knowledge of landscaping and maintenance in the interview and have some examples of previous work ready. Keep in mind that some employers may ask you to consent to a background check and drug test before starting.

Reach an agreement on pay and benefits before starting. Consider that some caretaker positions will offer benefits in lieu of full-time pay, such as use of the facilities, free housing and paid utilities.

References

About the Author

Nicole Long is a freelance writer based in Cincinnati, Ohio. With experience in management and customer service, business is a primary focus of her writing. Long also has education and experience in the fields of sports medicine, first aid and coaching. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Cincinnati.

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