Line Installers and Repairers

Annual Earnings Percentiles

Skill Scores

  • supported icon 60

    Supported

  • creative icon 33

    Creative

  • purpose icon 24

    Purpose

  • analytical icon 21

    Analytical

  • social icon 15

    Social

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College Majors

Showing data from the American Community Survey for the following US Census occupation categories:

Bachelor's degree majors are shown.

  • Electrical power-line installers and repairers
  • Telecommunications line installers and repairers

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    What Line Installers and Repairers Do

    Line installers and repairers, also known as line workers, install or repair electrical power systems and telecommunications cables, including fiber optics.

    Work Environment

    Line workers encounter serious hazards on the job, including working with high-voltage electricity, often at great heights. The work also can be physically demanding. Although most work full time during regular business hours, some work irregular hours on evenings, nights, weekends, and holidays when needed.

    How to Become a Line Installer or Repairer

    To become proficient, most line installers and repairers require technical instruction and long-term on-the-job training. Apprenticeships are common.

    Job Outlook

    Employment of line installers and repairers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be best for those with good technical and mechanical skills. Those looking to become electric power-line installers should have the best job prospects.

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    Job Trends for Line Installers and Repairers

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    This occupation supported 249,400 jobs in 2012 and 236,600 jobs in 2014, reflecting a decline of 5.1%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to increase by 7.3% in 2022 to 267,700 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 253,000, compared with an observed value of 236,600, 6.5% lower than expected. This indicates current employment trends are much worse than the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 5.5% in 2024 to 250,300 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 271,300 jobs for 2024, 8.4% higher than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are much worse than the 2012 trend within this occupation.

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