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How to Get a Job at Kroger

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As one of the largest grocery companies in the United States, Kroger (kroger.com) has job openings in most states. Since Kroger offers benefits to even part-time employees, they can be a great company to work for -- but they don't hire just anyone. To increase your chances of getting hired, you need to be flexible; perhaps your favorite department isn't hiring right now, but there are other openings in the store. Kroger offers paid, in-store training for applicants willing to learn something new.

Steps to Getting Hired by Kroger

Verify that your resume is current. Add any recent work experience or education changes. Include your telephone number, since this is Kroger's preferred method of contacting applicants.

Take your resume to the store you would like to work in. Ask if you can fill out an application. Be prepared to complete the lengthy computerized form.

Call the store after five days if you haven't heard anything and speak with the Service Director. Ask if your application has been reviewed and whether you could arrange an interview.

Dress in clean clothing and arrive for your interview at least 15 minutes before your appointment. Answer questions in a friendly, professional manner. Be prepared to take a drug test.

Call the Service Director after two days to thank him and ask whether you fit the store's current openings. Be willing to accept a different position than the one you originally applied for.

Tip

Persistence is the key to getting any job. If you aren't hired by Kroger immediately due to a lack of openings, follow up with the Service Director in a few weeks. This will demonstrate your desire to work there. Most Kroger stores are unionized, which means you must join the union and pay dues in order to work there. Seniority plays a factor in scheduling. Be prepared to start working at Kroger on a part-time basis and build up to a full-time position.

References

Resources

About the Author

A former sportswriter for the "Mount Vernon News," Debbie Henthorn has been a freelancer since 2008. She is a strong advocate of slow foods, owns a licensed home bakery and covers food issues for various online publications. A former operations manager, Henthorn has also arranged budget-stretching travel throughout the United States.

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