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How to Look for Work Over Age 60

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of October 2010, the national unemployment rate was 9.6 percent. With this many people looking for work, finding a job can be difficult. Combine this with the ill affects of increased age, and the search for a job can seem almost impossible. If you are over 60 and looking to for work, don't give up. You can have success finding a job by employing a few common tactics combined with determination.

Compile a resume of your most outstanding work achievements. Do not list everything you have done; instead, choose only to highlight your most recent achievements. Avoid listing dates that would indicate your age. This includes graduation dates and dates of employment that include your first job after graduation. Take classes to refresh your knowledge of computer skills. This lets the employer know that you are up to date with technological advances and just might give you a competitive edge over younger applicants.

Use job search sites that are designed for older individuals seeking employment (see Resources). This will help you feel more confident about applying for job openings that are posted.

Utilize the benefits of traditional and online networking to help make contacts and form relationships that can help land you a job. List all of the contacts you make with notes about what connections they may have, and ensure that they know you are actively seeking work.

Follow up an interview with a thank you letter that includes job-related information you didn't reveal in your interview or resume. This creates more data points for the employer to have when referencing you.

Consider entering a new industry. Although this may seem intimidating, certain job fields such as the medical industry are expected to grow by as much as 30 percent through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This can make landing a job in this field easier now and offer increased job security in the future.

About the Author

Based in Asheville, N.C., Aaron Ratliff started writing as a journalist for his hometown radio station in 1997. He is currently a North Carolina licensed Emergency Medical Technician and a certified personal trainer. Ratliff is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in health promotion at Appalachian State University.

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