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How to Get an OSHA Card

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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a federal agency providing federal standards for workplace health and safety. OSHA standards are implemented in all public agencies, and many service providers in the private sector use OSHA guidelines as a way to ensure measurable standards of health and safety. Additionally, many employees, private contractors and professionals working in service industries elect to receive training and certification through an OSHA training course. An OSHA card indicating completion of a course or certificate program can help individuals in professional development and ensure the public of a standardized level of knowledge about health and safety concerns.

Visit the OSHA Web site.

Click on the "Training" tab on the right side of the navigation bar at the top of the page.

Click the "OSHA Training Institute Education Centers" link to view a map of all the regional centers around the United States.

Select a location close to you or, if you live in a place without a nearby OSHA Training Institute, click the "Online Courses" link under the "Quick Links" heading on the right side of the page.

Select the course or certificate program most applicable to your work. You can find course offerings and descriptions by clicking the "Course Offerings" tab at the top of the page.

Register for a course by clicking on the specific link for the educational center or the school or university that hosts the class. Online courses are frequently based out of regional colleges, and registration is through the college's Web site.

Complete the course. Courses and training range from a half-day session to multiple weeks, depending on the type of training or certification and the level. After completing the requirements of the course or training, you will be issued a card or certificate.

Warning

There are many Web sites that guarantee OSHA-recognized training. To ensure that your training is compliant, use the official OSHA Web site to find a certified training course.

About the Author

Dean Blumberg is a full-time English instructor and began writing professionally in 2008. He writes about music, literature, and comics for popmatters.com and 10listens.com. He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Vermont and received an Master of Arts in English with a certificate in rhetoric & composition from Appalachian State University.

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