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How to Study for an HVAC Test

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The HVAC test stands for Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning and is an exam necessary for those who aspire to be technicians. Most aspiring technicians first take a certification course; at the end of the course each of them must take the HVAC exam in order to get a license. Even if you have understood everything that you've studied in your certification course, you should still practice for the exam, as it is difficult. You will have two hours to complete the test. Most states consider a passing score on this exam to be 75 percent. While there are expensive courses designed just for HVAC test preparation, you can prepare yourself at home for a fraction of the price.

Purchase a study book for the HVAC such as "HVAC Licensing Study Guide" by Mark R. Miller or "HVAC Technician Certication Exam Guide" by Norm Christopherson.

Create a study schedule and commit to it. Set aside time each day to work through the book, giving yourself at least one to two hours.

Read about each subject covered by the test such as heat, heat sources, colling systems, duct systems, EPA refrigeration handlers, filters and air flow, and cooling and distribution systems. Read about each subject even if it focuses on something that you feel is easy or that you understand completely. Answer all the questions that follow that chapter.

Check your answers and circle any questions that you answered incorrectly. Review those questions until you understand why your answer was not the correct choice.

Complete the practice test at the back of the book, giving yourself two hours. Alternatively, you can find a free practice test by visiting the website johnrwhite.net.

Check your answers to the practice test and compile your score. Review sections of the test where your score was lower or you had difficulty.

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About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."

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