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How to Negotiate a Salary for a State Job

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A state job is an occupation with a state or federal government agency. These jobs often have specific guidelines regarding salary, and are ranked by education, relevant experience and years of experience. Most government agencies, including state agencies, operate on a small budget. When negotiating salary for a state job, you should consider all of these factors and provide facts and comparisons to receive the best possible salary offer.

Find salary information on the state's Web site. Most states post salary ranges listed by level of experience, department or the job title.

Consider your relevant experience, skills and education. Requirements often include education, job and computer software skills and a certain number for years of experience. If you do not meet all of the requirements, the state will need to train you for specific areas of the job, which can require time and money. Take careful notes to compare your qualifications with the qualifications of the job.

Negotiate your salary. Consider your lowest salary expectation and be prepared to accept it. Carefully review your qualifications with the hiring manager, and explain why you feel you deserve the salary you're requesting. By showing you understand the job responsibilities and have considered all aspects of the job, the hiring manager may consider your salary expectations.

Warning

Never ask for the highest salary available. In most cases, a state agency will not offer it, and may decline making you a job offer. Seeking the highest salary doesn't allow for additional growth or wage increases.

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