x
office job image by Oleg Kulakov from Fotolia.com

How to Get a Job With No Experience

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Finding employment with no job experience may seem daunting, but many opportunities exist for people with little or no work experience. Many businesses, like clothing stores and restaurants, hire workers with no job experience and provide on-the-job training. With careful research and with a well-written resume, you may soon find yourself with your very first job.

Keep an open mind about the employment opportunities available to you. You may not want to work as a waitress or sales clerk, but these jobs may lead to a managerial position. Entry-level jobs provide the necessary stepping stones for you to progress to higher positions.

Create a resume. Even if you have no work experience, nearly all businesses will ask you to provide a resume before they consider hiring you. Your resume may include: your level of education, any leadership positions you have held (captain of a sports team or president of a club), your set of skills (typing, researching, writing, organizing), and two or three references. Your references should be people who know you well and who can vouch that you are a responsible and hard-working person. (Consider asking a teacher, religious leader, neighbor or family friend to be a reference. Do not ask family members to act as your references.) Your resume should fit onto one page and should be printed on 8.5-by-11-inch white paper.

Start networking. Many people obtain jobs through social networking. Ask your family and friends about job opportunities at their place of employment; let them know you are looking for a job and ask them to tell you about any job openings they may hear about. Also, visit local restaurants, stores and other businesses you frequent to inquire about any open positions.

Look for entry-level positions in the newspaper or search online at sites like Monster.com or CareerBuilder.com. Choose a few jobs that interest you and fill out an application form. You should also consider job fields that often hire workers with little or no experience. Head to a shopping mall, grocery store, movie theater or community center to see if they are hiring. You may want to search the job boards at your local community center, too. Often, these boards are filled with part-time and entry-level positions for child care, elderly care or small handy jobs like lawn-mowing and weeding.

Consider an internship or volunteer opportunities. Obtaining an internship or signing up as a volunteer are useful ways to build your resume and get practical job experience. Some internships also provide a small stipend. To attain an internship or to become a volunteer, research companies or organizations that peak your interest (an animal shelter, a community theater or a local business). Contact the human resources department to see if any internship or volunteer opportunities are available at the organization. If the company is in need of an intern or volunteer, fill out any necessary application forms and arrange a time for an interview. Alternately, you may search for internships online at Internships.com.

Register with a temporary agency. Temporary agencies, often called temp agencies, align their workers with short-term jobs. At times, these short-term positions turn into full-time jobs. Find a temp agency in your area (such as Kelly Services or the American Staffing Association) and register to become one of their workers. You will need to provide the agency with a list of your skills and any pertinent experience you have. You may also need to take a drug test.

Tip

Be prepared to work for a low wage. If you have little or no job experience, your first job will most likely pay minimum wage. To earn more money, make sure to work hard at your job and have patience. Once you demonstrate to your employer that you are a reliable employee, you can ask for a raise or look for a higher paying position.

Warning

Steer clear of scams. It may be tempting to take on a job that touts unbelievable pay with no job experience necessary, but most of these "opportunities" turn out to be scams. Be wary of positions like postal forwarding, stuffing envelopes, data entry and processing checks, since many of these jobs are actually scams. Stay away from job opportunities that ask you for an upfront fee, provide little job description and promise high wages immediately.

About the Author

A native of Washington, D.C., Caroline Tung Richmond has worked as a freelance writer since 2007. Her articles have appeared in both print and online publications such as the "Baltimore Sun," "Highlights" and Travels.com. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brigham Young University.

Cite this Article