How to Get a Union Job

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Union jobs provide workers with the confidence that a team stands behind them, dedicated to solving issues. And those who hold these jobs typically earn 30 percent more then those who don’t belong to a union. These jobs also have a reputation for providing good benefits and pension plans. But many seeking to break into a union job wonder where to find work. Here’s how to get a union job.

Join an apprenticeship program. If you are seeking a trade union job such as machinist, electrician or welder, you can seek entry into an apprentice program. These are sponsored by the trade-specific unions with comprehensive training, and may lead to a paid position upon completion.

Check with the labor union directly. If you have experience in the profession already, you can contact the labor union directly. The AFL-CIO has a directory of unions. They can provide information on job listings in your area.

Check the service employee’s international union. For those seeking union jobs with the government or city, contact the Service Employees International Union. They can provide resources, career fair information, and answer questions you have about union jobs.

Check the union job clearinghouse. This company is devoted to providing union job listings. There are staff, trade and apprentice positions listed.

Network with individuals in your trade. Experts agree one of the best ways to find a new position is through networking. Join professional organizations that allow you an opportunity to network with union professionals.

Tip

Refresh your resume when applying for union or apprentice jobs. If resume writing isn’t your area of expertise, you can hire an inexpensive professional to assist in sprucing up your resume.

Warning

Search for union jobs daily. Although you can’t search all day for union jobs, devote at least 1 hour daily to your job search. This will assist in landing you a job quicker.

About the Author

Nicki Howell started her professional writing career in 2002, specializing in areas such as health, fitness and personal finance. She has been published at health care websites, such as HealthTree, and is a ghostwriter for a variety of small health care organizations. She earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration from Portland State University.

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