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Pennsylvania IV Certification

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Registered nurses in Pennsylvania, with specialized training in intravenous therapy, are certified by The Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation. INCC is the only nationally recognized accredited certification for infusion nursing.

Eligibility

In order to be certified, nurses need at least 1,600 hours of experience in infusion therapy within the past two years. Experience can be in any of several areas and doesn’t have to be bedside experience. Nurses must also provide a current, unrestricted Registered Nurse license.

Application

Applicants for certification must submit an examination application form, a clinical practice documentation and affirmation form, proof of their current license and employer appreciation information, which lets INCC know if your employer is covering part of the cost. These forms should be submitted along with the fee.

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Fees

The 2011 certification fee for members of the Infusion Nurses Society is $335. Non-members pay $460. The fee for recertification is $485 for INS members and $635 for non-members.

Recertification

Nurses are recertified every three years. Recertification can be done by exam or by continuing education.

Locations

The certification test is given in the H&R Block offices located in Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Wyoming. Specific address information is provided to each candidate when exams are scheduled.

Exam

The exam takes three hours and consists of 170 multiple-choice questions. Over 25 percent of the questions deal with technology and clinical applications. Other topics include fluid and electrolyte therapy, pharmacology and antineoplastic therapy. A complete outline of the exam content can be found in the CRNI Bulletin.

Resources

About the Author

Lani Thompson began writing in 1987 as a journalist for the "Pequawket Valley News." In 1993 she became managing editor of the "Independent Observer" in East Stoneham, Maine. Thompson also developed and produced the "Clan Thompson Celiac Pocketguides" for people with celiac disease. She attended the University of New Hampshire.

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