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Who Are the Key Stakeholders Involved in Nursing Programs?

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A nursing program is a college degree that provides aspiring nurses the necessary education and training for their careers. They include diploma, associate, bachelor's and master's degree programs. Stakeholders of nursing programs include the students who complete them as well as school personnel, employers and patients.

Aspiring Nurses

Nurses are the most directly affected stakeholder of a nursing program. The point of completing nursing school is to gain the necessary experience to succeed in a nursing career. Nurses rely on access to convenient, affordable and quality courses to meet state licensing requirements. All states require licensing for registered nurses, reports the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The educational requirement includes completion of a nursing degree through an "approved" program.

School Personnel

The schools that offer nursing programs also have a vested interest in their success. College boards and administrators offer programs that attract students and generate revenue for the college. College leaders, along with administrators and faculty in the health sciences programs, desire to build a quality program that is recognized by state nursing boards. Faculty prestige and success are based on their ability to attract stellar students and prepare them for careers in nursing.

Nursing Employers

Employers of nurses also care about the quality of college nursing programs. Hospitals, doctors' offices and home health programs rely on well-trained nurses to deliver effective care to their patients. Some medical practices maintain a close working relationship with nursing programs by serving as clinical sites. During typical nursing degree studies, students spend time gaining hands-on experience in a medical practice. Employers may have a chance to recruit potential employees through partnership with area colleges.

Communities and Patients

The populations served by health care practitioners are among those most affected by the quality of nursing programs and graduates. People struggling with chronic health issues or coping with traumatic events rely on competent care providers. Students who gain the knowledge and experience necessary during a nursing program are more apt to deliver this quality care. Along with technical medical skills, nurses also learn the importance of care, compassion and communication in making patients feel comfortable.

References

About the Author

Neil Kokemuller has been an active business, finance and education writer and content media website developer since 2007. He has been a college marketing professor since 2004. Kokemuller has additional professional experience in marketing, retail and small business. He holds a Master of Business Administration from Iowa State University.

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