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Job Description of a House Manager

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

The word “house” usually refers to a building that people live in. Houses that have a house manager, however, are special kinds of houses. In the healthcare industry, house manager is another term for a nursing unit manager. House manager can also refer to individuals who oversee halfway houses, which is where recovering drug addicts and released criminals receive life skills to prepare to reenter the outside world.

Function

In a nursing care unit, house managers oversee the work performed by nursing staff and make sure that patients are receiving adequate care. Nurses who don't follow quality care standards are disciplined by the house manager. The house manager is also responsible for serving as a trainer for newly hired nurses.

At the halfway house, house managers oversee the budget of those staying at the halfway house. They're responsible for keeping all necessary records and are also responsible for communicating with parole officers. Whenever an item is damaged in the halfway house, the house manager is responsible for making sure that the damage is repaired. The house manager is also responsible for handling all security at the halfway house.

Skills

In the medical field, the house manager must have a bachelor’s degree in nursing and hands-on experience. At Henry Ford Health, for example, the house manager must have three to five years of experience. She must also have good leadership skills, including interpersonal skills, since she'll be working both with other nurses and with patients.

House managers at halfway houses receive on-the-job training, though they must have at least a high school diploma. Individuals who have a background in social services or psychology are the most likely to be hired.

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Conditions

At care units, house managers can potentially be exposed to illnesses. However, as with all professions in the healthcare industry, proper safety precautions can keep the house manager safe.

House managers at halfway houses work in houses that are usually furnished and may be fairly comfortable, depending on the budget of the halfway house program. These house managers do have to spend some time doing yard work. Individuals living in a halfway house are sometimes under a great deal of stress and might become volatile in some circumstances. A house manager, therefore, has to be prepared to deal with these potentially dangerous situations.

Outlook

The need for nurses such as house managers between 2008 and 2018 is expected to grow by 22 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nurses and other healthcare professionals can expect job growth due to an aging population.

While there is no specific data on how much the need for halfway house managers is expected to grow, the Michigan State website reports that there should be a large number of job openings because many house managers leave the profession.

Earnings

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2008, the median earnings for nurses were $62,450, with the highest 10 percent earning more than $92,240 and the lowest 10 percent earning less than $43,410. PayScale.com reported that clinical operations managers can earn an hourly wage of between $13.33 and $49.13.

As for correctional officers such as halfway house managers, the median salary was $38,380, with the highest 10 percent earning more than $64,110 and the lowest 10 percent earning less than $25,300, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

2016 Salary Information for Registered Nurses

Registered nurses earned a median annual salary of $68,450 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, registered nurses earned a 25th percentile salary of $56,190, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $83,770, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 2,955,200 people were employed in the U.S. as registered nurses.

About the Author

Charles Pearson has written as a freelancer since 2009. He has a B.S. in literature from Purdue University Calumet and is currently working on his M.A. He has written the ebooks "Karate You Can Teach Your Kids," "Macadamia Growing Handout" and "The Raw Food Diet."

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