house image by Earl Robbins from Fotolia.com

Resident House Manager Job Description

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

A resident house manager supports elderly and disabled persons in maintaining their independence. Resident house managers take on a supervisory role in an interdisciplinary support team including clinicians, therapists, behaviorists and direct care staff. Team members work together to develop and implement residential treatment plans for individuals living within the home.

Intake, Discharge and Treatment Plan Development

The residential house manager assists the governing program or agency in residential intake, discharge and treatment plan development. Program structures vary greatly, and a house manager's involvement in the intake and discharge process will also vary. The house manager may assist in transporting the resident to their new home or may assist residents in transitioning to their next level of care. In addition, the house manager works closely with clinicians and therapists in developing and evaluating residential treatment plans. The house manager reports the resident's progress and challenges to the administrative team based upon day-to-day information shared by direct care staff. This information helps clinicians and therapists adjust the treatment plans and goals of individual residents.

Community Liason

The residential house manager acts as resource between the residents and community services. The house manager must have an in-depth knowledge of resources pertaining to elderly and disabled client services. House managers share that information with direct-care staff and program administration to ensure that residents receive the highest level of care. For example, a house manager may become aware of a new adult day-care facility opening locally. Upon visiting the facility, the house manager may decide to share the information with the treatment team. The treatment team may deem the adult day-care program a healthy and positive fit for one of the home's residents and add weekly visits to the treatment plan.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by Sapling
Brought to you by Sapling

Household Management

The residential house manager is directly responsible for the day-to-day operation of the home. House managers often manage household budgets, pay household bills, purchase supplies and groceries for the home, and contact contractors for necessary repairs. House managers must also keep the home in compliance with necessary state and local laws governing group homes. The program or agency running the home should provide compliance assistance and education.

Supervise and Manage Direct-Care Staff

The resident house manager supervises and manages all direct-care staff. The manager must hire, discipline and terminate employees as well as maintain employment records, including certifications.The resident house manager must also train all employees to meet each resident's needs. While the direct-care staff member is responsible for the day-to-day care of the residents, the house manager is ultimately responsible for everything that takes place within the home. The house manager must very closely monitor the interactions of the direct-care staff and residents.

Skills and Qualifications

Qualifications for a position in residential house management will vary by state and agency. Most residential house managers possess a strong working knowledge of senior care and care of individuals with disabilities. Agencies often require a bachelor's degree in psychology, rehabilitation or special education, or similar working experience. The hiring agency or program may provide specialized management training and business training.

Skills necessary for the position include some knowledge of budgeting, understanding of medical terminology, experience in supervising others, patience, customer service and a love of serving senior and disabled populations. As of 2010, Salary Expert lists the average salary for a group home or residential house manager at $39,000.

About the Author

Based in Pittsburgh, Sarah Kathleen Hedman has been writing in various forms since 2002. She holds a B.A. in rehabilitation counseling and and M.A. in higher education administration. She has held positions in health care, education and childcare. In addition to freelance writing, she operates a lifestyle management and childcare business. She has recently published with eHow.

Cite this Article