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Ford 1910 Tractor Specs

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The Ford 1910 is a relatively small tractor, weighing just 2966 pounds with a 67 inch wheelbase, sold between 1983 and 1986, replacing the Ford 1900. Made for Ford by Japan's Shibaura company, this compact tractor ran on diesel fuel and featured optional four-wheel drive. A number of attachments, including a mower, snow blower and back hoe were all available to extend the functionality.

Engine

The Shibaura three cylinder naturally aspirated diesel engine in the Ford 1910 tractor has a 1.7 liter displacement and generates 32 horsepower. It operates at a compression ratio of 21 to one and has bore and stroke measurements of 3.346 and 3.947 inches, respectively. With a rated fuel consumption of 2.236 gallons per hour, the 9.2 gallon fuel tank will last for almost half a day. It runs smoothly, thanks to 6.9 quarts of engine oil and stays cool with 7.4 quarts of liquid coolant. A 12-volt starter, supported by a 35-amp alternator, coupled with a glow-plug system, help the engine to start in cold weather.

Transmission

The standard transmission in the Ford 1910 has 12 forward and four reverse speeds, propelling the tractor to a maximum forward speed of 13.5 miles per hour. A synchro mesh transmission with the same number of gears is also available, as is a transfer case, allowing the tractor to operate with all four wheels driven, instead of just two.

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Nebraska Test Results

The University of Nebraska tested the 1910 with both regular and synchro transmissions in 1984 in tests 1507 and 1508. The tests found that the regular transmission model generated 28.60 hp for the power take-off function, 24.76 hp at the drawbar, and a maximum drawbar pulling capacity of 3,340 lbs. Test 1508 with the synchro transmission indicated similar measurements of 28.52 hp for PTO and 24.57 drawbar hp, but indicated that the synchro transmission has less pulling capacity, with it hitting a maximum of only 2,566 lbs.

About the Author

Solomon Poretsky has been writing since 1996 and has been published in a number of trade publications including the "Minnesota Real Estate Journal" and "Minnesota Multi-Housing Association Advocate." He holds a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, from Columbia University and has extensive experience in the fields of financial services, real estate and technology.

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