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List of Machine Shop Tools

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Tools used in a machine shop can be utilized for both large and small jobs. These may be power or manual tools. It is important to use caution when operating any tools to avoid accidents. When used cautiously, these tools can be used to craft elaborate projects or to put the finishing touches on small details.

Drill

The two types of machine drills are the bench and pillar drill. The bench drill drills through metal, wood and plastic. The pillar drill is larger and stands on the floor. It is used to drill larger materials and to make larger holes. When drilling, always use the guard, wear goggles and secure the materials to the base.

Miter Saw

The miter saw is safer than other cutters because it is stable with built-in guards. The saw makes the 90-degree crosscut which is the most common cut. It can pivot and tilt for angled cuts to provide precision with its fixed blade. The miter saw also can cut exact shapes because it can shave off tiny bits of wood.

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Sander

To get a smooth finish, use a sander. The two types of sanders are the orbital and belt sander. The orbital, suitable for finishing projects, is used on large, flat surfaces and on course or fine wood. The belt sander has to be kept moving continuously because it has a rotating belt. This sander requires about 500 to 1,200 watts of power.

Rotary Hammer

The rotary hammer uses large bits to drill into concrete and other solid objects. The operator does not have to use a lot of energy and the rotary hammer does the work efficiently. This tool does not vibrate as much as a regular drill. Extra vibration makes the hammer's parts wear out quickly.

Adjustable Wrenches

Adjustable wrenches come in various sizes and adjust to fit nuts and bolts. Some of these wrenches are the crescent, monkey, pipe and strap wrench. The wrenches are made of chrome and steel to prevent corrosion. The strap wrench wraps around an object and applies pressure.

About the Author

Based in North Carolina, Victoria Thompson has taught middle school for the past 15 years. She holds a Masters of Education in middle school instruction from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She teaches English daily to English as a second language students.

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