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Manual Cable Burial Tools

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Manual cable burial tools are essential to many electricians and construction workers, according to Franklin Fueling. Manual tools are important when workers are not using high-powered machinery to dig trenches or lay cable pipe. It is critical for workers to adhere to safety warnings on all tools and abide by state and local codes during the burial process.

Power Tools

Many gas- or battery-powered pieces of equipment are important manual power tools used when burying cable. Cutting through concrete is often a necessity when burying cable, according to Franklin Fueling. Concrete saws and drills are manual power tools helpful for this process. Saws are often powered by gas and can come with adjustable-depth blades for alternate cutting. Industrial drills are typically electrical or battery-charged and are used with carbide drill bits. Air compressors are also useful for removing debris from long stretches of cable piping or concrete trenches. High voltage extension cords are essential to run power to electrically charged equipment as well.

Hand Tools

A wide selection of hand tools are helpful manual cable burial tools. Sledge hammers and cold chisels, for example, are used for breaking odd sections of concrete block; and, according to Franklin Fueling, sledge hammers are most effective when weighing at least four pounds. Screwdrivers and wrenches are needed for attaching and detaching machinery and cable pipe. Additionally, wire cutters and utility knives are useful for cutting cable sheathing.

Safety Tools

Safety tools are essential to keep workers efficient and out of harm's way. Safety glasses are necessary when using all power hand tools and manual tools to prevent debris from entering the eyes, according to Franklin Fueling. Rubber gloves are needed to protect skin when applying silicone sealers or using other forms of sealers or fuel. Protective masks should also be worn when cutting into large, sharp materials or soldering cable pipes.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.

Photo Credits

  • the part of chain saw with sharp tooth image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com