the capitol building in washington d.c. image by Gary from Fotolia.com

Types of Political Jobs

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

With the belief that inclusion and participation help shape our government, the economy and the world around us, those involved in politics seek to enact, change and support a variety of interests. Those searching for a career in politics will find a myriad of options available, ranging from grassroots support to positions on the national stage.

Public Service

Public service involves participating in the evaluation of public needs and helping draft legislation that supports policy initiatives and public goals. Public service positions include those tasked with developing and overseeing local, state and federal development and future growth. This includes local offices, such as a position on your local community council or city council, and state positions including governor, secretary of state and additional appointed and elected positions. Federal government positions, including senator and representative posts, allow those interested in politics to get involved on the national level. Support positions, including entry-level opportunities as a staff assistant or scheduler, are included among public service options.

Advocacy

Advocacy incorporates positions that help influence the direction of policy and legislation on all levels—local, state and federal. Public interest groups and industries employ lobbyists to influence policy initiatives in their favor. Lobbyists push to educate and inform government representatives and their staff on the potential impact of decisions and policies. Political activists seek to champion their cause and develop strategies to limit the potential negative effects of legislative decisions. Other positions that support advocacy in the political realm include policy researcher, communications director and event planner.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by Sapling
Brought to you by Sapling

Campaign

Positions within local, state and federal campaigns can lead to future opportunities, depending on the success of the candidate. Entry-level work includes canvassing neighborhoods and placing calls to solicit support and educate constituents about current issues and candidate views and plans. Campaign managers, field organizers and advertising consultants help support the campaign by determining overall campaign goals and evaluating the need for additional help. Polling positions help gauge constituent reactions to campaign advertisements and overall candidate performance among segments of the voting population. Other options related to campaign work include finance director and social network coordinator.

About the Author

Nicole Long is a freelance writer based in Cincinnati, Ohio. With experience in management and customer service, business is a primary focus of her writing. Long also has education and experience in the fields of sports medicine, first aid and coaching. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Cincinnati.

Cite this Article