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Objectives for a Training Manager

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A training manager plays an important role within a company. This position is established when there is a constant stream of new hires and/or current employees who require training. Their duties include training employees on new and updated programs, and helping them work on any problems they may be having on things they were previously trained to do. The training manager helps increase employee productivity as well as maintain a level of proficiency within the company.

Train New Employees

New employees need to be trained on company procedures and programs. Although a new employee ideally has the experience and knowledge for the position, there are often specific procedures unique to the company that he must learn. The training manager is responsible for creating and implementing training materials and activities to ensure all new hires are properly trained.

Train Current Employees

Employees who are already proficient with the companies procedures will need to be trained on new and updated programs and procedures. Companies update their systems from time to time and incorporate new technologies or more efficient programs. All employees must be trained and made proficient in these new programs. It is the training manager's objective to introduce the new programs and have all employees trained on them in a timely manner.

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Bring All Employees up to Standards

Through the course of employment, a company's employees may need to be reintroduced to the standards of the company. Some employees may forget certain procedures or how to work with infrequently used programs.The training manager refreshes the employees' memory, if requested. A training manager will also retrain an employee who is referred to them by a different manager because the employee has been working inefficiently with a program or procedure.

Assess Employee Productivity

Training managers must work closely with the other managers to see that they are addressing the needs and concerns of the department. They need to base their training materials and activities around things that the other managers see as necessary. It is also their responsibility to address any concerns other managers might gave about a specific employee's level of proficiently in what he was trained to do. The departments' managers and the training manager must work together to produce well-trained employees.

About the Author

Latoya McGill began her writing career in 2008 as a marketing assistant preparing press releases. She became a contributing writer for "Nommo Newsmagazine." She then continued her writing career as a publicist for "Madam C.J. Walker's Road to Success" and Web site content contributor for TheCashFlow.com. She received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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