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The Average Pay in New Hampshire for Adult Foster Care

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The adult foster care system in New Hampshire relies on compassionate people who open their homes to those too disabled or elderly to take care of themselves. These clients don't require the level of care offered by institutions. Adult foster care provides personal care, companionship, transportation and other services 24 hours a day. The average yearly pay for adult foster care providers in the Granite State is about $29,000, as of 2011.

Salary

Adult foster care workers in New Hampshire earn an average of $75 to $80 per day per client, according to Pamela Dube, senior director of communications for Easter Seals New Hampshire. This charitable organization hires foster care providers for adults it serves. Providers are hired as independent contractors and don't receive benefits packages. In addition to providing room and board, they cook for clients, bathe them if they can't do so themselves, monitor their medications, arrange appointments and make sure their other basic daily needs are met.

Community Involvement

Adult foster care providers are responsible for looking after their clients' emotional and mental well-being. They are encouraged to help clients stay engaged in volunteer work and other social activities. This also helps providers strengthen their own network of contacts with charitable organizations, activist groups and social clubs in their area.

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Wisdom From Seniors

Seniors benefit from the tight-knit atmosphere adult foster care can provide, and they are often treated as part of the provider's family. Elderly people missing their families become like grandparents to children in the home and are available to share their wisdom. This allows seniors to recall and verbalize memories, which is particularly beneficial to those with mild to mid-level dementia.

Considerations

Providing adult foster care can be stressful and emotionally taxing, and it requires a patient person who enjoys making a living helping others. The biggest reward may not be in the pay but in the joy that comes from the words of thanks, kind smiles and occasional hand-drawn cards from clients grateful to have someone to care for them like family.

About the Author

Chenault Yeoman has been writing professionally since 2002. She has written for JazzTimes.com, "The Source" magazine and several other music and technology publications. Yeoman is completing a Bachelor of Arts in journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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