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How Much Do Skydivers Make?

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Skydiving is typically considered a sport, or a type of recreational activity, one that people must pay in order to do rather than get paid in order to accomplish. However, this is not always the case. Skydivers can go through several levels of certification, and with enough experience it is possible to earn wages by helping other people to skydive, and instructing those interested in also earning various levels of certification.

Money Per Jump

Many skydivers are paid by each jump that they make. Usually, this means jumping with someone else, a less experienced diver, either as part of training or as a recreational assistant. Pay for this assistance is low, and usually comes to around $40 per jump, according to the Education-Portal.com. Many skydivers only dive as a hobby, or a part time job, since the money they make tends to be low.

Additional Wages

Skydivers do not have to make money only through jumping. Skydiving can take a lot of preparation. Divers who are willing to prepare suits and parachutes, helping with training and videotape, or take pictures of people diving, can earn extra money to help boost their income. This can bring hourly rates as high as $31 for some workers, according to KayCircle.com.

Total Salary

Salaries vary widely based on the skydiving organization and how involved the skydiving instructor is. For those who work year-round and operate full time, yearly salaries may reach as high as $44,000 per year, according to KayCircle.com. However, for a more general range, most skydivers make an average of between $20,000 and $40,000 per year, according to JobMonkey.com.

As a Competitor

Some skydivers are talented enough (and willing to accept the danger) to perform tricks and skydiving shows in various competitions. These skydivers can be paid much more than ordinary instructors, because of the complexity of the jumps and the experience required for the position. The median annual wage for this category, which falls under sports competition, is $87,000, according to MyMajors.com.

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About the Author

Tyler Lacoma has worked as a writer and editor for several years after graduating from George Fox University with a degree in business management and writing/literature. He works on business and technology topics for clients such as Obsessable, EBSCO, Drop.io, The TAC Group, Anaxos, Dynamic Page Solutions and others, specializing in ecology, marketing and modern trends.