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How to Pass the WorkKeys Math Test

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The WorkKeys test is a nationally administered standardized test designed to assess applied mathematics, writing and reading skills. Prospective students or employees may be required to pass the WorkKeys test as a prerequisite to class enrollment or a job interview. The math section of the test consists of 33 work-related word problems and includes a formula sheet for the test-takers’ reference. Test takers may use a calculator to solve problems and have 45 to 55 minutes to complete the test with a pencil and paper or online, respectively.

Read about your state’s requirements for passing scores in WorkKeys. This information should be available through your state’s department of education. The WorkKeys math assessment includes items from Levels 3 to 7, but certain states consider demonstrated knowledge of Level 4 or 5 to be a passing score. In this case, you can pass the test even if you can’t answer higher-level items.

View sample items on the WorkKeys Applied Mathematics page and attempt to solve them. Pay special attention to items at and below the level required to pass the test in your state. Lower-level items deal with basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division skills, as well as elementary math concepts such as averages and rounding. Higher-level items require test takers to calculate area and volume. All items are in word-problem format and many require knowledge of decimals.

Make a note of any math concepts you have difficulty with. Contact a university or community college to inquire about tutoring. Purchase practice tests online or enroll in an online class to improve your skills.

View the sample items again once you are more comfortable with the test material. Schedule an appointment to take the test after successfully solving the practice problems.

Tip

You can retake the WorkKeys test as many times as necessary.

About the Author

Christina Sloane has been writing since 1992. Her work has appeared in several national literary magazines.

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