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How to Pass the Reid Test

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The Reid Report is an assessment tool used by employers to identify individuals who have high moral standards and impeccable work ethics. Employers might give this test to potential employees to determine who would be the greatest asset to the company, which would boost productivity and decrease turnover rates. This test consists of 50 to 100 questions and takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. Depending on your moral value, passing this test could be more difficult than you think.

Consider what you find to be a commendable work ethic in the days leading up to the test. Think about what will be expected of you at your new job (if you do pass the test), and do some soul searching over whether you would be able to commit to this. If you were chronically late at your last job but truly believe you can make a change, then solidify this commitment before the test. Making up your mind to be responsible and succeed should have a positive effect on your answers.

Think positively about yourself and your capabilities. Individuals who pass the Reid test tend to have good ego strength, are optimistic and enjoy working with people. Embrace and embody your most positive qualities, and convince yourself that you have access to these qualities at all times. This will help you to answer the questions in a way that will reflect you at your very best, painting a picture of a confident team player who is not deterred by setbacks.

De-stress the day before the test. This could mean getting a massage, going to your favorite class or clearing your schedule of hectic responsibilities for the day. Dealing with high levels of anxiety while going into any test can have a negative impact on the results. In addition, individuals who do well on the Reid test tend to be less anxious, so minimizing this element within yourself can be crucial to passing.

Fake your answers slightly if you are truly desperate to pass the test. Unlike most other integrity tests (such as the Personnel Selection Inventory) or psychological assessment tests (such as the MMPI-2), there is no lie scale that helps detect whether an individual is "faking good" (which means lying to make yourself look better than you are). If a question asks whether you ever use swear words and you don't cuss like a trucker, you might as well say "No."

Answer every single item on the test. Failure to do so can make you look sloppy, inconsistent or careless, which are all qualities that the test is hoping to screen out of the workplace. Make sure to submit the test in a timely manner, because taking twice the allotted time has serious implications on your work efficiency.

About the Author

Ashley Schaeffer has been writing professionally since 2005, specializing in arts-and-entertainment, health and wellness topics. She has written extensively for "Buzzine Magazine," the culture and entertainment publication of Richard Elfman. Schaeffer holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in comparative literature and Spanish, both from UC Berkeley, and is pursuing a master's degree in counseling psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies.

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