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How to Become a Drive-By Field Inspector

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Becoming a drive-by field inspector requires little upfront costs or expensive classes. According to the Society of Field Inspectors (SOFI), most inspection firms provide training and guidance during the inspection process. While little training is needed, drive-by field inspectors must have an eye for detail with basic people and photography skills. If you possess these qualities, a career as a drive-by field inspector may be right for you.

How to Become a Drive-By Field Inspector

Purchase a simple digital camera, computer and cell phone. According to SOFI, inspection companies require drive-by field inspectors to have this equipment before a position can be accepted. While a basic digital camera and cell phone is sufficient, a high-speed Internet connection is recommended.

Create a resume. According to SOFI, a drive-by inspector resume should include contact information, previous job experience and the zip codes or metropolitan areas you currently service or have serviced. Real estate experience, while not required, should be included if applicable.

Locate field inspection firms. Very few firms advertise for drive-by field inspection positions, so applicants must purchase a field directory from SOFI, which is available for $84, scour the yellow pages or seek out other inspectors.

Follow the application instructions on the field inspection company's website. A typical company requires a resume and a completed W-2 form for consideration as a drive-by field inspector. After your application is accepted, check your e-mail often for drive-by inspection opportunities.

Tip

According to SOFI, approximately two percent of field inspection firms require drive-by field inspectors to carry insurance. It is recommended that these firms be avoided because the insurance is costly and the pay is low.

About the Author

Theresa Bruno began her writing career as a librarian in 2008. She published an article in "Indiana Libraries" and has written many book reviews for "American Reference Book Annual" and "Reference and User Services Quarterly." Before becoming a writer, Bruno received a bachelor's degree in history/religious studies from Butler University and taught American history at Ivy Tech Community College.

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