Masonry Workers

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Annual Earnings Percentiles

Skill Scores

  • creative icon 25

    Creative

  • supported icon 24

    Supported

  • analytical icon 18

    Analytical

  • purpose icon 8

    Purpose

  • social icon 6

    Social

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College Majors

  • Cement masons, concrete finishers, and terrazzo workers
  • Brickmasons, blockmasons, stonemasons, and reinforcing iron and rebar workers
  • Miscellaneous construction workers, including solar photovoltaic installers, septic tank servicers and sewer pipe cleaners

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    What Masonry Workers Do

    Masonry workers, also known as masons, use bricks, concrete blocks, concrete, and natural and manmade stones to build walls, walkways, fences, and other masonry structures.

    Work Environment

    The work is physically demanding because masons lift heavy materials and often must stand, kneel, and bend for long periods. Poor weather conditions may reduce work activity because masons usually work outdoors. Most masons work full time.

    How to Become a Masonry Worker

    Most masons have a high school diploma or equivalent and learn either on the job or through an apprenticeship program. Others learn through 1- or 2-year masonry programs at technical schools.

    Job Outlook

    Employment of masonry workers is projected to grow 15 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Population growth will result in the construction of more schools, hospitals, homes, and other buildings. Workers with a good job history and with experience in masonry and construction should have the best job opportunities.

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    Job Trends for Masonry Workers

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    This occupation supported 231,200 jobs in 2012 and 252,900 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 9.4%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to increase by 31.0% in 2022 to 302,800 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 245,500, compared with an observed value of 252,900, 3.0% higher than expected. This indicates current employment trends are better than the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 16.1% in 2024 to 290,200 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 317,100 jobs for 2024, 9.3% higher than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are much worse than the 2012 trend within this occupation.

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