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How to Write Special Attributes, Skills & Interests on a Resume

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When writing up a resume, you will often want to accentuate more than just your schooling and your work history. Perhaps a specific skill or attribute makes you specially qualified for a certain job or maybe you want to point out that you are very interested in a certain field pertaining to your job target. It is important that you place this information in the proper place and refrain from adding needless info to your resume. It is imperative that you keep your resume clean and concise.

Find out if you are allowed to send a cover letter in addition to your resume when applying to a job. This information is often written on the apply page if applying to a job online, or, if you are applying for a job in person, ask someone who would know. If you are allowed to send a cover letter, use it to highlight your specific attributes, skills and interests.

Write a skills or achievements section (the actual title of the heading is up to you) at the bottom of your resume. Use this section to point out the skills or achievements that qualify you for the particular job for which you are applying. Do not mention skills or achievements that have nothing at all to do with the job in question.

Write any attributes that specifically qualify you for a job under the skills or achievements section of your resume. If you cannot figure out a way to word your attributes in such a way as to make them skills or achievements, try highlighting these attributes under your work experience or schooling section of your resume.

Avoid overtly mentioning interests in your resume. Again, a cover letter is a much more appropriate place to put this info. If you are not supposed to send a cover letter with your resume, you can attempt to draw attention to your interests through other sections of your resume. Remember, however, if you have no professional or scholastic achievements in your fields of interest, they are unlikely to matter when applying for a job anyway.

About the Author

Michael Black has been a freelance writer based in South Central Pennsylvania since 2010. He graduated from York College of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Arts degree in professional writing. He has written music- and writing-related articles for various websites.

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