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How to Train For Industrial Radiography

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

Industrial radiographers detect flaws, cracks and other defects in a product using electromagnetic radiation. According to the Nondestructive Testing Center (NDT), states and local municipalities have differing guidelines for training industrial radiographers. While training requirements vary, industrial radiographers must be detail-oriented, safety-conscious and able to learn on the job. Industrial radiography requires little training and, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, has an average wage of $15 an hour, as of 2010.

Get a high school diploma or GED. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, a high school diploma is needed for entry-level positions in industrial radiography. Employers prefer candidates who are computer literate and have analytical skills.

Check your state's guidelines for industrial radiography certification. Some states require only a 40-hour class on radiation and safety measures, while others require a more rigorous education and training program. For more information, contact your state's licensing board.

Get a job as a industrial radiography assistant. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, employers prefer training their own radiographers.

Become a certified industrial radiographer by the American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT). ASNT offers two levels of certification and requires passage of four exams. Level II certification requires 424 hours of on-the-job training, while Level III requires a college diploma in engineering or science and four years of industrial radiography experience. While the certification process may be daunting, it leads to better job prospects.

About the Author

Theresa Bruno began her writing career as a librarian in 2008. She published an article in "Indiana Libraries" and has written many book reviews for "American Reference Book Annual" and "Reference and User Services Quarterly." Before becoming a writer, Bruno received a bachelor's degree in history/religious studies from Butler University and taught American history at Ivy Tech Community College.

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